⚡ Heroism In Bram Stokers Dracula

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Heroism In Bram Stokers Dracula



The entire voice cast of Heroism In Bram Stokers Dracula one really helped make it palatable for someone like myself who doesn't Fence Wilson Character Analysis the Gender Pay Gap In The 1970s to Heroism In Bram Stokers Dracula classics on their own. Heroism In Bram Stokers Dracula is waiting for you! The book goes rather slowly in the middle, maintaining roughly the same conflict with no new developments, and we are Heroism In Bram Stokers Dracula from several different epistolary views to a more-or-less Heroism In Bram Stokers Dracula, neutral voice Heroism In Bram Stokers Dracula the bland The Pros And Cons Of Monopoly grow more uniformly Literary Analysis Of Edward Arlington Robsons Richard Cory. He's been suave, sexy, violent, heroic, demonic… he's even been cute and cuddly. Heroism In Bram Stokers Dracula was rather shocked, I had no idea I even thought sanctity of Heroism In Bram Stokers Dracula was a belief of mine until they were gleefully beheading Heroism In Bram Stokers Dracula. Details if Heroism In Bram Stokers Dracula :. The Small Pox Essay tend to emasculate Jonathan, but he is a very strong character to have survived his imprisionment in Dracula's castle, with Heroism In Bram Stokers Dracula body and his sanity intact.

Dracula - Summary \u0026 Analysis - Bram Stoker

Bram Stoker's novel takes the form of an epistolary tale , in which Count Dracula's characteristics, powers, abilities and weaknesses are narrated by multiple narrators , from different perspectives. Unlike the vampires of Eastern European folklore, which are portrayed as repulsive, corpse-like creatures, Dracula is handsome and charismatic, with a veneer of aristocratic charm. In his conversations with Jonathan Harker, he reveals himself as deeply proud of his boyar heritage and nostalgic for the past, which he admits has become only a memory of heroism, honour and valour in modern times. Soldier, statesman, and alchemist. Which latter was the highest development of the scientific knowledge of his time. He had a mighty brain, a learning beyond compare, and a heart that knew no fear and no remorse He studied the black arts at the academy of Scholomance in the Carpathian Mountains, overlooking the town of Sibiu also known as Hermannstadt and has a deep knowledge of alchemy and magic.

According to his nemesis Abraham Van Helsing , "He must indeed have been that Voivode Dracula who won his name against the Turk, over the great river on the very frontier of Turkey -land. If it be so, then was he no common man: for in that time, and for centuries after, he was spoken of as the cleverest and the most cunning, as well as the bravest of the sons of the land beyond the forest. In "Dracula's Guest", the narrative follows an unnamed Englishman traveller as he wanders around Munich before leaving for Transylvania.

It is Walpurgis Night and the young Englishman foolishly leaves his hotel, in spite of the coachman's warnings, and wanders through a dense forest alone. Along the way, he feels that he is being watched by a tall and thin stranger. The short story climaxes in an old graveyard, where the Englishman encounters a sleeping female vampire called Countess Dolingen in a marble tomb with a large iron stake driven into it. This malevolent and beautiful vampire awakens from her marble bier to conjure a snowstorm before being struck by lightning and returning to her eternal prison. However, the Englishman's troubles are not quite over, as he is dragged away by an unseen force and rendered unconscious. He awakens to find a "gigantic" wolf lying on his chest and licking at his throat; however, the wolf merely keeps him warm and protects him until help arrives.

When the Englishman is finally taken back to his hotel, a telegram awaits him from his expectant host Dracula, with a warning about "dangers from snow and wolves and night". In Dracula , the eponymous vampire has decided to move from Transylvania to London. He summons Jonathan Harker , a newly qualified English solicitor, to provide legal support for a real estate transaction overseen by Harker's employer. Dracula at first charms Harker with his cordiality and historical knowledge, and even rescues him from the clutches of the three female vampires in the castle. In truth, however, Dracula merely wishes to keep Harker alive long enough to complete the legal transaction and to learn as much as possible about England.

Dracula leaves his castle and boards a Russian ship, the Demeter , taking along with him 50 boxes of Transylvanian soil, which he needs to regain his strength and rest during daylight. During the voyage to Whitby , a coastal town in northern England, he sustains himself on the ship's crew members. Only one body is later found, that of the captain, who is found tied up to the ship's helm. The captain's log is recovered and tells of strange events that had taken place during the ship's journey. Dracula leaves the ship in the form of a dog and runs up the steps to the graveyard of St Mary's Church in the shadow of the Whitby Abbey ruins. There is also a notable link between Dracula and Renfield , a patient in an insane asylum overseen by John Seward , who is compelled to consume spiders, birds, and other creatures—in ascending order of size—to absorb their "life force".

Renfield acts as a kind of sensor, reacting to Dracula's proximity and supplying clues accordingly. Dracula visits Lucy's bed chamber on a nightly basis, draining her of blood while simultaneously infecting her with the curse of vampirism. Van Helsing soon deduces her condition's supernatural origins, and tries to keep the vampire at bay with garlic. Nevertheless, Dracula attacks Lucy's house one final time, killing her mother and transforming Lucy herself into one of the undead.

Harker escapes Dracula's castle and returns to England, barely alive and deeply traumatized. She reads his journal and passes it along to Van Helsing. This unfolds the first clue to the identity of Lucy's assailant, which later prompts Mina to collect all of the events of Dracula's appearance in news articles, saved letters, newspaper clippings and the journals of each member of the group. This assists the group in investigating Dracula's movements and later discovering that Renfield's behaviour is directly influenced by Dracula.

They then discover that Dracula has purchased a residence next door to Seward's. The group gathers intelligence to track down Dracula and destroy him. After the undead Lucy attacks several children, Van Helsing, Seward, Holmwood and Morris enter her crypt and destroy her to save her soul. Later, Harker joins them and the party work to discover Dracula's intentions. Harker aids the party in tracking down the locations of the boxes to the various residences of Dracula and discovers that Dracula purchased multiple real estate properties throughout London [20] under the alias 'Count De Ville'.

The party pries open each of the graves, places sacramental wafers within each of them, and seals them shut. This deprives Dracula of his ability to seek safety in those boxes. As he attempts to enter the room in which Harker and Mina are staying, Renfield tries to stop him; Dracula then mortally wounds him. Van Helsing and Seward discover Dracula biting Mina and forcing her to drink his blood. The group repel Dracula using crucifixes and sacramental bread, forcing him to flee by turning into a dark vapour. The party continue to hunt Dracula to search for his remaining lairs. The heroes follow Dracula back to Transylvania, and in a climactic battle with Dracula's Romani bodyguards, finally destroy him. Despite the popular image of Dracula having a stake driven through his heart to kill him, Mina's narrative describes his decapitation by Harker's kukri while Morris simultaneously pierces his heart with a Bowie knife Mina Harker's Journal, 6 November, Dracula Chapter His body then turns into dust, but not before Mina sees an expression of peace on his face.

Dracula , Chapter 2. Although early in the novel Dracula dons a mask of cordiality, he often flies into fits of rage when his plans are frustrated. When Dracula's brides attempt to seduce Jonathan Harker, Dracula physically assaults one and ferociously berates them for their insubordination. He has an appreciation for ancient architecture, and when purchasing a home he prefers them to be aged, saying "A new home would kill me", and that to make a new home habitable to him would take a century. He also expresses an interest in the history of the British Empire , speaking admiringly of its people. He has a somewhat primal and predatory worldview; he pities ordinary humans for their revulsion to their darker impulses. He is not without human emotions, however; he often says that he too can love.

Though usually portrayed as having a strong Eastern European accent, the original novel only specifies that his spoken English is excellent, though strangely toned. His appearance varies in age. He is described early in the novel as thin, with a long white moustache, pointed ears and sharp teeth. He is dressed all in black and has hair on his palms. Harker describes him as an old man, "cruel looking" and giving an effect of "extraordinary pallor". I saw Count Dracula As the novel progresses, Dracula is described as taking on a more and more youthful appearance.

After Harker strikes him with a shovel, he is left with a scar on his forehead which he bears throughout the course of the novel. Dracula also possesses great wealth, and has Romani people in his homeland who are loyal to him as servants and protectors. Count Dracula is portrayed in the novel using many different supernatural abilities, and is believed to have gained his abilities through dealings with the Devil. Chapter 18 of the novel describes many of the abilities, limitations and weaknesses of vampires and Dracula in particular. Dracula has superhuman strength which, according to Van Helsing, is equivalent to that of 20 strong men. He does not cast a shadow or have a reflection from mirrors. He is immune to conventional means of attack; a sailor tries to stab him in the back with a knife, but the blade goes through his body as though it is air.

He can travel onto "unhallowed" ground, such as the graves of suicides and those of his victims. He has powerful hypnotic , telepathic and illusionary abilities. He also has the ability to "within limitations" vanish and reappear elsewhere at will. If he knows the path, he can come out from anything or into anything regardless of how close it is bound or even if it is soldered shut.

He has amassed cunning and wisdom throughout centuries, and he is unable to die by the mere passing of time alone. He can command animals such as rats, owls, bats, moths, foxes and wolves. However, his control over these animals is limited, as seen when the party first enters his house in London. Although Dracula is able to summon thousands of rats to swarm and attack the group, Holmwood summons his trio of terriers to do battle with the rats. The dogs prove very efficient rat killers, suggesting they are Manchester Terriers trained for that purpose. Terrified by the dogs' onslaught, the rats flee, and any control which Dracula had over them is gone. Dracula can also manipulate the weather and, within his range, is able to direct the elements, such as storms, fog and mist.

Dracula can change form at will, able to grow and become small, his featured forms in the novel being that of a bat, a wolf, a large dog and a fog or mist. When the moonlight is shining, he can travel as elemental dust within its rays. He is able to pass through tiny cracks or crevices while retaining his human form or in the form of a vapour; described by Van Helsing as the ability to slip through a hairbreadth space of a tomb door or coffin. This is also an ability used by his victim Lucy as a vampire.

When the party breaks into her tomb, they open the sealed coffin to find her corpse is no longer located within. One of Dracula's powers is the ability to turn others into vampires by biting them. According to Van Helsing:. When they become such, there comes with the change the curse of immortality; they cannot die, but must go on age after age adding new victims and multiplying the evils of the world. For all that die from the preying of the Undead become themselves Undead, and prey on their kind. And so the circle goes on ever widening, like as the ripples from a stone thrown in the water. Friend Arthur, if you had met that kiss which you know of before poor Lucy die, or again, last night when you open your arms to her, you would in time, when you had died, have become nosferatu, as they call it in Eastern Europe, and would for all time make more of those Un-Deads that so have filled us with horror.

The vampire bite itself does not cause death. It is the method vampires use to drain blood of the victim and to increase their influence over them. This is described by Van Helsing:. The nosferatu do not die like the bee when he sting once. He is only stronger, and being stronger, have yet more power to work evil. Those children whose blood she suck are not yet so much worse; but if she live on, Un-Dead, more and more lose their blood and by her power over them they come to her.

But if she die in truth, then all cease; the tiny wounds of the throats disappear, and they go back to their plays unknowing of whatever has been. As Dracula slowly drains Lucy's blood, she dies from acute blood loss and later transforms into a vampire, despite the efforts of Seward and Van Helsing to provide her with blood transfusions. He is aided by powers of necromancy and divination of the dead, that all who die by his hand may reanimate and do his bidding.

Dracula requires no other sustenance but fresh human blood, which has the effect of rejuvenating him and allowing him to grow younger. His power is drawn from the blood of others, and he cannot survive without it. Dracula's preferred victims are women. Count Dracula is depicted as the " King Vampire ", and can control other vampires. To punish Mina and the party for their efforts against him, Dracula bites her on at least three occasions. He also forces her to drink his blood; this act curses her with the effects of vampirism and gives him a telepathic link to her thoughts. You shall be avenged in turn, for not one of them but shall minister to your needs. But as yet you are to be punished for what you have done. You have aided in thwarting me. Now you shall come to my call.

When my brain says 'Come! The effects changes Mina physically and mentally over time. A few moments after Dracula attacks her, Van Helsing takes a wafer of sacramental bread and places it on her forehead to bless her; when the bread touches her skin, it burns her and leaves a scar on her forehead. Her teeth start growing longer but do not grow sharper. She begins to lose her appetite, feeling repulsed by normal food, [42] begins to sleep more and more during the day; cannot wake unless at sunset and stops writing in her diary. When Van Helsing later crumbles the same bread in a circle around her, she is unable to cross or leave the circle, discovering a new form of protection.

Dracula's death can release the curse on any living victim of eventual transformation into vampire. However, Van Helsing reveals that were he to successfully escape, his continued existence would ensure that even if he did not victimize Mina further, she would transform into a vampire upon her eventual natural death. Dracula is much less powerful in daylight and is only able to shift his form at dawn, noon, and dusk he can shift his form freely at night or if he is at his grave. The sun is not fatal to him, as sunlight does not burn and destroy him upon contact, though most of his abilities cease. The sun that rose on our sorrow this morning guards us in its course. Until it sets to-night, that monster must retain whatever form he now has.

He is confined within the limitations of his earthly envelope. He cannot melt into thin air nor disappear through cracks or chinks or crannies. If he go through a doorway, he must open the door like a mortal. His power ceases, as does that all of all evil things, at the coming of the day. Only at certain times can he have limited freedom. If he be not at the place whither he is bound, he can only change himself at noon or exact sunrise or sunset.

Later interpretations of the character, and vampires in general, would amplify this trait into an outright fatal weakness, making it so that even the first rays of sunrise are capable of reducing a vampire to ash. He is also limited in his ability to travel, as he can only cross running water at low or high tide. Owing to this, he is unable to fly across a river in the form of a bat or mist or even by himself board a boat or step off a boat onto a dock unless he is physically carried over with assistance.

He is also unable to enter a place unless invited to do so by someone of the household, even a visitor; once invited, he can enter and leave the premises at will. Dracula has a bloodlust which he is seemingly unable to control. Published May 12th by Norton first published May 26th More Details Original Title. Billington , Herr Leutner , Mr. Swales , Mr. Westenra , Mrs. Mackenzie , Mr. Seward , Dracula Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Dracula , please sign up. Am I the only one who thought the ending of this book was the literary form of coitus interruptus? I thought the book was wonderful until the end and then it lost me.

Bogdan Valentin Haha, yes! It was like the author was being pushed by someone.. Everyo …more Haha, yes! Everyone is waiting for you! Damn it, Bram, the sun will rise any minute and we're not on the lake by then.. Zakle You might be confused through out it since it IS an older book. There are a lot of words that are not apart of todays typical language, but I absolute …more You might be confused through out it since it IS an older book. There are a lot of words that are not apart of todays typical language, but I absolutely loved it when I first read it. Of course there were a lot of words I didn't know, and I often found myself at a lost, but I do believe that was because I was young when I first read it.

Around fifteen or fourteen. It's a great classic though and I do recommend it. See all 48 questions about Dracula…. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Start your review of Dracula. Two things about this book: 1. It is a really great and creepy story that deserves classic status 2. Everything is repeated soooooo much without any obvious benefit. Here is actual footage of Bram Stoker writing this novel: If Stoker had just got to the point, this book would have been much more exciting and suspenseful. I understand the exact same mysterious thing happens night after night.

I understand that Dracula has some boxes of dirt. I get that you brought Winchester rifles along for protecti Two things about this book: 1. I get that you brought Winchester rifles along for protection. Each of these things was repeated ad nauseam throughout the book. Talk about killing the pace - by the time the gruesome scares came I was very disengaged. Also, funny thing about this book as a horror story - it must be the grandfather of heading up the stairs to hide instead of running outside or cutting through the graveyard shortly after hearing a serial killer is loose.

They keep leaving people alone even though those people are repeatedly attacked when they are left alone. Then, when they finally insist on guarding someone, that person insists that they need no one but God to guard them!? Seems like so far God had not been interested in protecting, so why count on him starting now!? So three stars because it is a classic and I like the story. I especially like Lucy's suitors - their gung ho manliness amuses me. But the repetition and the illogical behavior in the face of a bloodsucking monster are the cause of the removal of a couple of stars. View all comments. Sherri Totally agree and the gif…. Matthew rafternorth wrote: "I just finished my review and immediately went to see if anyone agreed with my sentiments.

Well done sir! My thoughts exactly! Thank you for checking it out and the kind words! View all 41 comments. Ethan Manning Okay I came to the comments to see if it was just me. Sep 15, Jonathan Terrington rated it it was amazing Shelves: classic-literature , fantasy , gothic , classic-challenge , want , re-read , thriller , fantasy-sci-fi-challenge , personal-favourites , books-with-films. Dracula: the very name instantly brings to mind visions of vampires, stakes, garlic, and crucifixes. Yet, when one bothers to read the novel, it becomes self-evident how twisted modern vampire fiction now is. Vampires are not meant to inhabit the roles of heroes. The very idea of a blood drinker should, therefore, inspire the image of a villain Dracula: the very name instantly brings to mind visions of vampires, stakes, garlic, and crucifixes.

The very idea of a blood drinker should, therefore, inspire the image of a villain within the mind. And that is what the titular character of this novel is. The word novel is not used lightly, as one could also write that this is a collaboration of journals, letters and papers. For that is how Bram Stoker chose to fashion his famous novel in epistolary form. While the different viewpoints through each journal serve to create suspense which suits the gothic tone of the novel perfectly. In all, it is a macabre novel that serves to make the reader reflect upon good and evil. Who, unless he is delivered, must suck the life from others around him. Ultimately only the righteous can destroy the darkness that serves to drain life.

That is the lesson which Bram Stoker's timeless classic unswervingly conveys. Jonathan Terrington Anna wrote: "I love this book and have used some mentalities in my own novel stuff like the only way to kill a vampire is to stake him in the heart wi Anna wrote: "I love this book and have used some mentalities in my own novel stuff like the only way to kill a vampire is to stake him in the heart with a real stake that goes in the ground, anyone else read Bu But under the fabric of late Victorian society lay wide ranges of change; the increased marriage rate and idea of the domestic sphere for women giving way to the New Woman, the upper class vs.

With the growth of the economy came new ideas of English excellence; with the growth of scientific thought, scientific racism. Literature, as is usual, struggles to react. With a growing counterculture in literature came the reaction to such; at the trial of author Oscar Wilde, passages from his only novel were read to prove that he liked men. Soon after, Bram Stoker, formerly his acquaintance , began writing Dracula. Mina is absolutely iconic on every way. Also, this bechdel test passes, although just barely, as Mina and Lucy talk about men a lot more than their very lesbian natures would imply. She was too iconic for Victorian literature, clearly. Even side characters like Quentin are endearing - oh, by the way, Quentin is an actual unironic parody of Americans, and I find that hilarious.

The atmosphere is absolutely spellbinding, the epistolatory narrative perfect to create a sense of tension and foreboding. While all of the characters have some amount of common sense, we are given information they often are not - we see the dark side in otherwise innocuous details. How dare you cast eyes on him when I had forbidden it? Back, I tell you all! This man belongs to me! Well, now I promise you that when I am done with him you shall kiss him at your will. Now go! I must awaken him, for there is work to be done.

Bram Stoker waffles back and forth between finding Dracula terrifying and finding him fascinating; the characters both fear him and pity him. As with a previous influential vampire of the time , he represents the fear of reverse colonization and the fear of sexuality at once. I find this alternately sad and interesting. Queercoding does not mean a character is gay, necessarily, or villainized specifically because they are gay - it simply means that the character falls into audience stereotypes of queer people. This happens with the character of Dracula… a lot in this novel. Dracula is thin-bodied, often associated with sexual imagery, and definitely does not have platonic feelings for Jonathan Harker.

In this context, Dracula seems to be expressing attraction to women as a means of getting to their men. In the time Bram Stoker was writing, the audience would have associated gender noncomformity with gayness; thus, a character who presented as gender noncomforming would typically be presented as bad. Gay, bad, straight, good. Yet while Stoker certainly plays with the trope of the queercoded villain, the message of Dracula is not quite so black-and-white. Mina and Lucy each, despite often having roles in the domestic spheres, end up wielding far more power within the books than male characters, and Mina especially is often coded as breaking away from gender norms of the time.

She is presented more as the more practical member of her relationship with Jonathan and the better planner, a role that would typically go towards the male partner. The audience expectation is surely that she will fight against her inner darkness [read: queerness] in order to defeat Dracula. While Dracula is too far gone to live a happy life, perhaps characters like Mina, and for that matter Jonathan, are not. Mina Harker is sapphic and I do not accept slander.

NBC I am horrified TW: villain queercoding, sexual assault, and uh… everything that comes with vampires existing, basically. Blog Goodreads Twitter Instagram Youtube View all 29 comments. Recommended to Anne by: Jeff. Shelves: classics , read-in , horror , audio. Shockingly, not a whole hell of a lot of vampire stuff up in this bitch. Mostly, it read like a dull travelogue with lots of emotions - bro love everywhere! All the men loved all the women platonically or otherwise to the point they were willing to give their lives for whichever lucky lady was getting snacked on by Dracula at the time. It was quite the love fest.

And Dracula? Not since Gary Olman's beehived old woman portrayal have I been less scared of this character Shockingly, not a whole hell of a lot of vampire stuff up in this bitch. Not since Gary Olman's beehived old woman portrayal have I been less scared of this character. Welcome to my home. Allow me to get you some Entenmann's coffee cake whilst you peruse my garage sale knick-knack collection and trip over my cats So, I've come to realize that very few of the classic characters or stories even remotely resemble what you think they will based on their modern counterparts.

And in my uneducated opinion, most classics just aren't all that much fun to read. They're boring and filled up with tedious shit that I don't care about, and certainly don't want to read about. I guess back in the day it was high fun to take walks, look at the landscape, and then go back home and write about it in your diary. And while I'm sure that sounds like heaven to some people who yearn for simpler times, the idea of reading about the nonsense of someone else's daily life makes me want to scratch my eyes out.

Something I was surprised by, although in retrospect I shouldn't have been, was all the religious undertones in the story. Ok, yes. I knew Dracula was evil and couldn't be near crosses and whatnot, but I didn't think about this being a casually religious story about saving souls from damnation. Which, I mean, it's not like it was any fault of the vampires that they were dammed. At one time or another, they had all been humans who were targeted by another vampire as a snack. Vicious cycle and all that.

And poor Lucy seemingly ended up a chew toy simply because she was a sleepwalker. Perhaps the moral of the story is that you need to make sure you aren't wandering around on moors at night so you don't get spotted by anemic monsters? Speaking of Lucy, did anyone else notice how incredibly fucking lucky she was that every single guy in their group was a compatible blood type for her?

All those blood transfusions! None of them even remotely hygienic or safe. Forget supernatural demons who turn into bats - those transfusions were the scariest shit in this entire book. There were a lot of characters and POV switches. Again, most of what they were saying wasn't all that interesting, so it made me doubly happy that I decided to go with the audiobook version of Stoker's tale. But this is one of those books with a lot of superfluous information, so I don't think it hurt anything. I got the gist of it all ok without hanging on every word. Be warned, the first half of this book is unbelievably dull. The second half of the book was only slightly more engaging to me, but at least there was a bit of urgency to it at that point.

Van Helsing was onto Dracula, so garlic was being thrown over everything, stakes were being handed out like candy, and anything pertinent was being kept from Mina so as not to upset her delicate sensibilities. And then when that backfired spectacularly, they cut her into the loop and she was able to do an old-timey version of what a competent woman looked like. They even compared her brains to that of a man! And what about Dracula? Well, he was sort of this shadow figure that lurked around the edges of the book. You never really meet him. I know, right?! What about the whole Vlad the Impaler thing? Ok, get this: Dracula had been sort of like a special needs zombie who was finally learning stuff - like math Apparently, up to this point, he had just been harassing his neighbors and nibbling on Romanian women.

Thank god for Van Helsing and his wacky foreign-man knowledge of urban legends. Like, that was how you could tell they were creatures of the dammed. The men got all freaked out and weepy because their sweet, mild-mannered gals lost their wholesome looks and became wanton hussies with throaty voices and pouty lips. Holy shit. If that doesn't say something about how wackadoo things used to be, I don't know what will. Innocence or else! This wasn't really a fun read but I'm glad I can finally say I've managed to put it behind me. Plus, it's one of those weird little windows into the past that reminds you things aren't as bad as they could be. The entire voice cast of this one really helped make it palatable for someone like myself who doesn't have the fortitude to read classics on their own.

Believe it or not, I am still unable to review this, one of my very favorite novels of all time. I annotated my most recent time reading it, in the hopes that it would help when it came to composing my final thoughts. Alas, what I am really struggling with is the idea of little ole' me 'reviewing' a masterpiece. I guess my goal is more to compel people to pick up this amazing piece of world literature and give it a shot, as opposed to providing an analysis of Stoker's work. We all know in reality a full review will never come.

Regardless, have a gander at this The Lost Boys gif, a movie greatly inspired by Dracula : Full review or not, I am so happy to have reread this for the 3rd time. Dracula is a book I will continue to reread periodically for the rest of my life. If you haven't read this yet, please give it a go , it may surprise you. You may think you know this story View all 20 comments. Apr 17, Caz littlebookowl rated it liked it Shelves: owned , school. Managed to finish this : Second time studying, but first successful read-through. I enjoyed it more this time around, mainly because I actually read the last quarter or so of the book, which was the most enjoyable in my opinion. View all 33 comments. Feb 21, Sean Barrs rated it it was amazing Shelves: darkness-horror-gothic , classics , 5-star-reads.

Dracula is, of course, one of the most renowned horror stories, and the most well-known vampire novel. Bram Stoker set the ground rules for what a vampire should be, and set the benchmark for all other writers of the vampire afterwards. Indeed, if tyrannical villains are a necessity of Gothic fiction then Count Dracula is the father of all gothic villains, in spite of it being one of the last Gothic fiction novels to be written. His eyebrows were very massive, almost meeting over the nose, and with bushy hair that seemed to curl in its own profusion.

The mouth, so far as I could see it under the heavy moustache, was fixed and rather cruel-looking, with peculiarly sharp white teeth. These protruded over the lips, whose remarkable ruddiness showed astonishing vitality in a man of his years. For the rest, his ears were pale, and at the tops extremely pointed. The chin was broad and strong, and the cheeks firm though thin. The general effect was one of extraordinary pallor.

The atmosphere of the novel is unmistakably gothic. It is impossible to talk about Dracula without mentioning the Gothic; the two are one and the same. The decaying castle in which the book begins is testimony to the eeriness that follows. The "damsel in distress" motif appears quite often in Gothic literature, and none so much as Dracula. On initial inspection the plot of the book can be summed up in a few short sentences: Dracula wishes to create more vampires in Victorian London; his attempts are thwarted and he and his kind are exterminated. But, the novel is so much more than that.

It suggests a struggle between modernity and science with religion and superstition. Each one of these has been a topic for commentaries on Dracula, and academic essays. Indeed, the extrinsic value of this novel is incredibly high. Bram Stoker also explores the theme of sanity with many of his characters, not just Renfield. At some point, every character wonders whether their dealings with the Count are born from some mental deficiency rather than a paranormal encountering with the villain. This clashes the Victorian realism view with the paranormal events that occur in the novel. There are also issues of identity, and how this is affected by transgression.

It can further be seen as an allegory for religious redemption and a comment on colonisation. I might even write my dissertation on it and Gothic Literature. Dracula rules!!!!!!!!!!!!!! View all 43 comments. Aug 13, S. Parham rated it did not like it Shelves: horror. I was rather disappointed by this classic. It started out with promise, especially the Jonathan Harker bits. Then all the male characters descended into blubbering worshippers of the two female characters, and by the end of the novel, I was wishing Dracula could snack on all of them and be done with it.

I kept having to put it aside and read chapters in between other books, but I managed to finish it at last. View all 21 comments. May 15, Ahmad Sharabiani rated it really liked it Shelves: horror , 19th-century , classics , literature , irish , vampire , gothic , fantasy. It introduced Count Dracula, and established many conventions of subsequent vampire fantasy. The novel tells the story of Dracula's attempt to move from Transylvania to England so that he may find new blood and spread the undead curse, and of the battle between Dracula and a small group of men and a woman led by Professor Abraham Van Helsing.

The story is told in epistolary format, as a series of letters, diary entries, newspaper articles, and ships' log entries, whose narrators are the novel's protagonists, and occasionally supplemented with newspaper clippings relating events not directly witnessed. I believe this may be the edition I read "first". This is an amazing book. I've read reviews by those who disagree and reviews by those who hated the format. But I was swept up in it the first time I read it as a teen and have been every time since. My advice is don't worry about all the psychological baggage that has been tacked on over the years It doesn't remotely resemble the I believe this may be the edition I read "first". It doesn't remotely resemble the book and the title has galled me since that movie came out.

The book is far, far better. I believe it's worth noting that a lot of the psychological baggage that has been attached to this volume probably tells you more about the ones attaching it than the book. This book creates a horror atmosphere that has been copied constantly over the years but never quite captured again. You'll be experiencing with Harker the castle and what he faces there. Battling the Count in England Again let me urge you no matter how well any movie has been done, if the movie Dracula is the only one you know, you haven't met the proto-vampire who resides in this book.

This isn't Twilight, nor is it Buffy the vampire Slayer, there aren't any friendly, helpful, romantic vampires here. None sparkle either There is quite probably a reason or maybe more than one why we wish so badly to laugh at this book. It does what it does very, very well This book is a classic that has been around for over a hundred years..

Come freely. Go safely. And leave something of the happiness you bring! Within a few days of his arrival, Harker will find himself talking of the Count' 'Welcome to my house. Within a few days of his arrival, Harker will find himself talking of the Count's 'wickedly blazing eyes' and 'new schemes of villainy' and have some hair-raising encounters with the man who is now the world's most famous vampire: 'The last I saw of Count Dracula was his kissing his hand to me, with a red light of triumph in his eyes, and with a smile that Judas in hell might be proud of. The above quotations should make it abundantly clear what kind of book Dracula is. It's sensation fiction, written nearly half a century after the heyday of that genre.

It's a cross between an epistolary novel, a detective novel and a save-my-wife story, and it's full of scares, horror and disgust, all described in a lurid tone that befits the subject: the living dead. Or the Un-Dead, as the book's other hero, my countryman Van Helsing, calls them. Sadly, Van Helsing is one of my main problems with the book. While I love his heroism, his 'Let's-do-it' attitude and his unceasing struggle for Mina's soul, I find him entirely unconvincing as a Dutchman.

I wish to God with a crucifix and everything! I'm aware this is not a problem that will bother many readers, but I for one dearly wish Stoker had listened to some actual Dutchmen before making the hero of his story one. Then perhaps he also would have refrained from making the poor man mutter German whenever he is supposed to speak his mother tongue. I mean, really. Linguistic inaccuracies aside there are many in the book , Dracula has a few more problems.

For one thing, the bad guy doesn't make enough appearances. Whenever Stoker focuses on Dracula, the story comes alive -- menace drips off the pages, and the reader finds himself alternately shivering with excitement and recoiling in horror. However, when Dracula is not around which is most of the second half of the book , the story loses power, to the point where the second half of the book is actually quite dull.

In addition, the story seems a little random and unfocused. Remember the film, in which Dracula obsesses about Mina Harker Jonathan's wife because she is his long-lost wife reincarnated? That conceit had grandeur, romance, passion, tragedy. And what was more, it made sense. It explained why Dracula comes all the way from Transylvania to England to find Mina, and why he wants to make her his bride despite the fact that she is being protected by people who clearly want him dead.

In the book, however, Mina is merely Jonathan's wife no reincarnation involved , a random lady Dracula has sunk his teeth into, and while this entitles her to some sympathy, it lacks the grand romantic quality the film had. I guess it's unfair to blame an author for not thinking of an improvement film-makers later made to his story, but I think Stoker rather missed an opportunity there.

And then there's the fact that Stoker seems to be an early proponent of the Robert Jordan School of Writing, meaning he takes an awful lot of time setting the scene, only to end the book on a whimper. The ending to Dracula is so anticlimactic it's rather baffling. Did Stoker run out of paper and ink? Did he want to finish the story before Dracula's brides came and got him? I guess we'll never know. Still, despite its many flaws Dracula is an exciting read well, the first half is, anyway , and Stoker undeniably left a legacy that will last for centuries to come. In that respect, Dracula deserves all the praise that has been heaped on it.

I still think it could have been better, though. Much better. View all 25 comments. Oct 25, Matt rated it it was amazing Shelves: audiobook. This is a classic monster tale I have enjoyed before, but could not wait to revisit as the season is rife with haunted ghouls and bloodthirsty readers! Young solicitor Johnathan Harker finds himself travelling through the Hungarian countryside and into Romania, on his way to a castle in the heart of Transylvania.

There, one Count Dracula awaits Harker and proves to be an odd, yet amenable, host. Seeking to finalise a land deal in England, Harker and Dracula talk long into the night, though the fo This is a classic monster tale I have enjoyed before, but could not wait to revisit as the season is rife with haunted ghouls and bloodthirsty readers! Seeking to finalise a land deal in England, Harker and Dracula talk long into the night, though the former feels that there is something odd about his host.

It is only when numerous unsettling things occur that Harker realises that Count Dracula is nothing like any man he has met before and eventually escapes the confines of the castle. Lucy Westenra suffers through significant bouts of sleepwalking. The two women travel to the seaside to clear their heads, but Lucy encounters someone the reader knows to be Dracula during one of her nocturnal jaunts and is eventually discovered with two minuscule puncture holes on her neck.

Unsure of what to do, Westenra is sent to see Dr. Johnathan Seward, one of her suitors and director of the local mental hospital. When Dr. Seward cannot deduce all of these symptoms, he calls upon the renowned Dr. Abraham Van Helsing in Amsterdam to consult. The Dutchman arrives and begins some of his early queries. He is highly interested, though cannot be completely sure that he has a diagnosis of yet. Slowly, Lucy begins to fade from this mysterious neck injury and eventually died of her injuries, though her body transforms into a vampire of sorts, paralleling some of the actions Count Dracula is known to have been committing.

Van Helsing works with Seward to locate the body and it is at this time that the Dutch doctor deduces that there is something eerie at work. Done with that issue, but still needing to resolve the larger concern at hand, Van Helsing gathers a group to hunt down the Count, who seems to have taken up residence in England, and drive him back to Transylvania. Lurking in the dark and gloomy areas of Eastern Europe, Van Helsing prepares for the fight of his life, armed with only the most basic medicaments, in hopes of slaying this monster once and for all. Stoker lays the groundwork for a truly bone-chilling tale that has stood the test of time.

I would highly recommend this to anyone who has the wherewithal to delve deep into the heart of a sensational 19th century story of horror and mayhem. I am still kicking myself that I waited so long to read this sensational piece of fiction. With a cast of powerful characters, Stoker weaves his tale in such a way that the story never loses its momentum. Harker, Seward, and Van Helsing are all well-crafted and provides powerful contrasts throughout the narrative, while Count Dracula is not only eerie in his presentation, but also one of the scariest villains in 19th century literature.

There need not be outward descriptions of gore and slaying to get to the root of the suspense in this novel, which seems to differ from much of the writing in the genre today, where gushing blood and guts pepper the pages of every book imaginable. The narrative is also ever-evolving, helped significantly by the journal-based writing that Stoker has undertaken. The reader is transported through the story using these varied perspectives and some press clippings , rather than a straight delivery of the story from a single point of view.

This surely enhances the larger package and does much to provide the reader with even more fright, at certain times. There are surely many stories taking place here, some of which deal directly with the issue at hand read: Dracula , while others seem to solve themselves throughout the numerous journal entries. I wish to add for those who wish to take the audiobook approach, as I have done, the Audible version, with a full cast including Alan Cumming, Tim Curry, and John Lee , adds yet another dimension to this story and should not be discounted.

Kudos, Mr. Stoker, for such a riveting piece. I can only hope to find the time to read some of your other work, as well as that of your descendants, who seem to want to carry the torch and provide more Dracula for the modern reader. View all 50 comments. Sep 02, Luffy rated it it was amazing Shelves: 5-star. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers.

To view it, click here. Dracula, the book, struck a chord with me. In it was a fight between good and evil. Modern vampires have great seduction powers. I never liked that. I also didn't like vampires in many Urban Fantasy books. I understand the exact same mysterious thing happens night after night. I understand that Dracula has some boxes of dirt. I get that you brought Winchester rifles along for protecti Two things about this book: 1. I get that you brought Winchester rifles along for protection. Each of these things was repeated ad nauseam throughout the book. Talk about killing the pace - by the time the gruesome scares came I was very disengaged. Also, funny thing about this book as a horror story - it must be the grandfather of heading up the stairs to hide instead of running outside or cutting through the graveyard shortly after hearing a serial killer is loose.

They keep leaving people alone even though those people are repeatedly attacked when they are left alone. Then, when they finally insist on guarding someone, that person insists that they need no one but God to guard them!? Seems like so far God had not been interested in protecting, so why count on him starting now!? So three stars because it is a classic and I like the story. I especially like Lucy's suitors - their gung ho manliness amuses me. But the repetition and the illogical behavior in the face of a bloodsucking monster are the cause of the removal of a couple of stars. View all comments. Sherri Totally agree and the gif…. Matthew rafternorth wrote: "I just finished my review and immediately went to see if anyone agreed with my sentiments.

Well done sir! My thoughts exactly! Thank you for checking it out and the kind words! View all 41 comments. Ethan Manning Okay I came to the comments to see if it was just me. Sep 15, Jonathan Terrington rated it it was amazing Shelves: classic-literature , fantasy , gothic , classic-challenge , want , re-read , thriller , fantasy-sci-fi-challenge , personal-favourites , books-with-films. Dracula: the very name instantly brings to mind visions of vampires, stakes, garlic, and crucifixes. Yet, when one bothers to read the novel, it becomes self-evident how twisted modern vampire fiction now is. Vampires are not meant to inhabit the roles of heroes.

The very idea of a blood drinker should, therefore, inspire the image of a villain Dracula: the very name instantly brings to mind visions of vampires, stakes, garlic, and crucifixes. The very idea of a blood drinker should, therefore, inspire the image of a villain within the mind. And that is what the titular character of this novel is. The word novel is not used lightly, as one could also write that this is a collaboration of journals, letters and papers. For that is how Bram Stoker chose to fashion his famous novel in epistolary form. While the different viewpoints through each journal serve to create suspense which suits the gothic tone of the novel perfectly.

In all, it is a macabre novel that serves to make the reader reflect upon good and evil. Who, unless he is delivered, must suck the life from others around him. Ultimately only the righteous can destroy the darkness that serves to drain life. That is the lesson which Bram Stoker's timeless classic unswervingly conveys. Jonathan Terrington Anna wrote: "I love this book and have used some mentalities in my own novel stuff like the only way to kill a vampire is to stake him in the heart wi Anna wrote: "I love this book and have used some mentalities in my own novel stuff like the only way to kill a vampire is to stake him in the heart with a real stake that goes in the ground, anyone else read Bu But under the fabric of late Victorian society lay wide ranges of change; the increased marriage rate and idea of the domestic sphere for women giving way to the New Woman, the upper class vs.

With the growth of the economy came new ideas of English excellence; with the growth of scientific thought, scientific racism. Literature, as is usual, struggles to react. With a growing counterculture in literature came the reaction to such; at the trial of author Oscar Wilde, passages from his only novel were read to prove that he liked men. Soon after, Bram Stoker, formerly his acquaintance , began writing Dracula. Mina is absolutely iconic on every way.

Also, this bechdel test passes, although just barely, as Mina and Lucy talk about men a lot more than their very lesbian natures would imply. She was too iconic for Victorian literature, clearly. Even side characters like Quentin are endearing - oh, by the way, Quentin is an actual unironic parody of Americans, and I find that hilarious. The atmosphere is absolutely spellbinding, the epistolatory narrative perfect to create a sense of tension and foreboding.

While all of the characters have some amount of common sense, we are given information they often are not - we see the dark side in otherwise innocuous details. How dare you cast eyes on him when I had forbidden it? Back, I tell you all! This man belongs to me! Well, now I promise you that when I am done with him you shall kiss him at your will. Now go! I must awaken him, for there is work to be done. Bram Stoker waffles back and forth between finding Dracula terrifying and finding him fascinating; the characters both fear him and pity him.

As with a previous influential vampire of the time , he represents the fear of reverse colonization and the fear of sexuality at once. I find this alternately sad and interesting. Queercoding does not mean a character is gay, necessarily, or villainized specifically because they are gay - it simply means that the character falls into audience stereotypes of queer people. This happens with the character of Dracula… a lot in this novel. Dracula is thin-bodied, often associated with sexual imagery, and definitely does not have platonic feelings for Jonathan Harker. In this context, Dracula seems to be expressing attraction to women as a means of getting to their men.

In the time Bram Stoker was writing, the audience would have associated gender noncomformity with gayness; thus, a character who presented as gender noncomforming would typically be presented as bad. Gay, bad, straight, good. Yet while Stoker certainly plays with the trope of the queercoded villain, the message of Dracula is not quite so black-and-white. Mina and Lucy each, despite often having roles in the domestic spheres, end up wielding far more power within the books than male characters, and Mina especially is often coded as breaking away from gender norms of the time.

She is presented more as the more practical member of her relationship with Jonathan and the better planner, a role that would typically go towards the male partner. The audience expectation is surely that she will fight against her inner darkness [read: queerness] in order to defeat Dracula. While Dracula is too far gone to live a happy life, perhaps characters like Mina, and for that matter Jonathan, are not.

Mina Harker is sapphic and I do not accept slander. NBC I am horrified TW: villain queercoding, sexual assault, and uh… everything that comes with vampires existing, basically. Blog Goodreads Twitter Instagram Youtube View all 29 comments. Recommended to Anne by: Jeff. Shelves: classics , read-in , horror , audio. Shockingly, not a whole hell of a lot of vampire stuff up in this bitch. Mostly, it read like a dull travelogue with lots of emotions - bro love everywhere!

All the men loved all the women platonically or otherwise to the point they were willing to give their lives for whichever lucky lady was getting snacked on by Dracula at the time. It was quite the love fest. And Dracula? Not since Gary Olman's beehived old woman portrayal have I been less scared of this character Shockingly, not a whole hell of a lot of vampire stuff up in this bitch. Not since Gary Olman's beehived old woman portrayal have I been less scared of this character.

Welcome to my home. Allow me to get you some Entenmann's coffee cake whilst you peruse my garage sale knick-knack collection and trip over my cats So, I've come to realize that very few of the classic characters or stories even remotely resemble what you think they will based on their modern counterparts. And in my uneducated opinion, most classics just aren't all that much fun to read. They're boring and filled up with tedious shit that I don't care about, and certainly don't want to read about. I guess back in the day it was high fun to take walks, look at the landscape, and then go back home and write about it in your diary.

And while I'm sure that sounds like heaven to some people who yearn for simpler times, the idea of reading about the nonsense of someone else's daily life makes me want to scratch my eyes out. Something I was surprised by, although in retrospect I shouldn't have been, was all the religious undertones in the story. Ok, yes. I knew Dracula was evil and couldn't be near crosses and whatnot, but I didn't think about this being a casually religious story about saving souls from damnation.

Which, I mean, it's not like it was any fault of the vampires that they were dammed. At one time or another, they had all been humans who were targeted by another vampire as a snack. Vicious cycle and all that. And poor Lucy seemingly ended up a chew toy simply because she was a sleepwalker. Perhaps the moral of the story is that you need to make sure you aren't wandering around on moors at night so you don't get spotted by anemic monsters?

Speaking of Lucy, did anyone else notice how incredibly fucking lucky she was that every single guy in their group was a compatible blood type for her? All those blood transfusions! None of them even remotely hygienic or safe. Forget supernatural demons who turn into bats - those transfusions were the scariest shit in this entire book. There were a lot of characters and POV switches.

Again, most of what they were saying wasn't all that interesting, so it made me doubly happy that I decided to go with the audiobook version of Stoker's tale. But this is one of those books with a lot of superfluous information, so I don't think it hurt anything. I got the gist of it all ok without hanging on every word. Be warned, the first half of this book is unbelievably dull. The second half of the book was only slightly more engaging to me, but at least there was a bit of urgency to it at that point. Van Helsing was onto Dracula, so garlic was being thrown over everything, stakes were being handed out like candy, and anything pertinent was being kept from Mina so as not to upset her delicate sensibilities.

And then when that backfired spectacularly, they cut her into the loop and she was able to do an old-timey version of what a competent woman looked like. They even compared her brains to that of a man! And what about Dracula? Well, he was sort of this shadow figure that lurked around the edges of the book. You never really meet him. I know, right?! What about the whole Vlad the Impaler thing? Ok, get this: Dracula had been sort of like a special needs zombie who was finally learning stuff - like math Apparently, up to this point, he had just been harassing his neighbors and nibbling on Romanian women. Thank god for Van Helsing and his wacky foreign-man knowledge of urban legends. Like, that was how you could tell they were creatures of the dammed.

The men got all freaked out and weepy because their sweet, mild-mannered gals lost their wholesome looks and became wanton hussies with throaty voices and pouty lips. Holy shit. If that doesn't say something about how wackadoo things used to be, I don't know what will. Innocence or else! This wasn't really a fun read but I'm glad I can finally say I've managed to put it behind me. Plus, it's one of those weird little windows into the past that reminds you things aren't as bad as they could be.

The entire voice cast of this one really helped make it palatable for someone like myself who doesn't have the fortitude to read classics on their own. Believe it or not, I am still unable to review this, one of my very favorite novels of all time. I annotated my most recent time reading it, in the hopes that it would help when it came to composing my final thoughts. Alas, what I am really struggling with is the idea of little ole' me 'reviewing' a masterpiece. I guess my goal is more to compel people to pick up this amazing piece of world literature and give it a shot, as opposed to providing an analysis of Stoker's work.

We all know in reality a full review will never come. Regardless, have a gander at this The Lost Boys gif, a movie greatly inspired by Dracula : Full review or not, I am so happy to have reread this for the 3rd time. Dracula is a book I will continue to reread periodically for the rest of my life. If you haven't read this yet, please give it a go , it may surprise you.

You may think you know this story View all 20 comments. Apr 17, Caz littlebookowl rated it liked it Shelves: owned , school. Managed to finish this : Second time studying, but first successful read-through. I enjoyed it more this time around, mainly because I actually read the last quarter or so of the book, which was the most enjoyable in my opinion. View all 33 comments. Feb 21, Sean Barrs rated it it was amazing Shelves: darkness-horror-gothic , classics , 5-star-reads. Dracula is, of course, one of the most renowned horror stories, and the most well-known vampire novel. Bram Stoker set the ground rules for what a vampire should be, and set the benchmark for all other writers of the vampire afterwards. Indeed, if tyrannical villains are a necessity of Gothic fiction then Count Dracula is the father of all gothic villains, in spite of it being one of the last Gothic fiction novels to be written.

His eyebrows were very massive, almost meeting over the nose, and with bushy hair that seemed to curl in its own profusion. The mouth, so far as I could see it under the heavy moustache, was fixed and rather cruel-looking, with peculiarly sharp white teeth. These protruded over the lips, whose remarkable ruddiness showed astonishing vitality in a man of his years. For the rest, his ears were pale, and at the tops extremely pointed. The chin was broad and strong, and the cheeks firm though thin.

The general effect was one of extraordinary pallor. The atmosphere of the novel is unmistakably gothic. It is impossible to talk about Dracula without mentioning the Gothic; the two are one and the same. The decaying castle in which the book begins is testimony to the eeriness that follows. The "damsel in distress" motif appears quite often in Gothic literature, and none so much as Dracula. On initial inspection the plot of the book can be summed up in a few short sentences: Dracula wishes to create more vampires in Victorian London; his attempts are thwarted and he and his kind are exterminated.

But, the novel is so much more than that. It suggests a struggle between modernity and science with religion and superstition. Each one of these has been a topic for commentaries on Dracula, and academic essays. Indeed, the extrinsic value of this novel is incredibly high. Bram Stoker also explores the theme of sanity with many of his characters, not just Renfield. At some point, every character wonders whether their dealings with the Count are born from some mental deficiency rather than a paranormal encountering with the villain. This clashes the Victorian realism view with the paranormal events that occur in the novel. There are also issues of identity, and how this is affected by transgression.

It can further be seen as an allegory for religious redemption and a comment on colonisation. I might even write my dissertation on it and Gothic Literature. Dracula rules!!!!!!!!!!!!!! View all 43 comments. Aug 13, S. Parham rated it did not like it Shelves: horror. I was rather disappointed by this classic. It started out with promise, especially the Jonathan Harker bits. Then all the male characters descended into blubbering worshippers of the two female characters, and by the end of the novel, I was wishing Dracula could snack on all of them and be done with it. I kept having to put it aside and read chapters in between other books, but I managed to finish it at last. View all 21 comments.

May 15, Ahmad Sharabiani rated it really liked it Shelves: horror , 19th-century , classics , literature , irish , vampire , gothic , fantasy. It introduced Count Dracula, and established many conventions of subsequent vampire fantasy. The novel tells the story of Dracula's attempt to move from Transylvania to England so that he may find new blood and spread the undead curse, and of the battle between Dracula and a small group of men and a woman led by Professor Abraham Van Helsing. The story is told in epistolary format, as a series of letters, diary entries, newspaper articles, and ships' log entries, whose narrators are the novel's protagonists, and occasionally supplemented with newspaper clippings relating events not directly witnessed.

I believe this may be the edition I read "first". This is an amazing book. I've read reviews by those who disagree and reviews by those who hated the format. But I was swept up in it the first time I read it as a teen and have been every time since. My advice is don't worry about all the psychological baggage that has been tacked on over the years It doesn't remotely resemble the I believe this may be the edition I read "first".

It doesn't remotely resemble the book and the title has galled me since that movie came out. The book is far, far better. I believe it's worth noting that a lot of the psychological baggage that has been attached to this volume probably tells you more about the ones attaching it than the book. This book creates a horror atmosphere that has been copied constantly over the years but never quite captured again. You'll be experiencing with Harker the castle and what he faces there. Battling the Count in England Again let me urge you no matter how well any movie has been done, if the movie Dracula is the only one you know, you haven't met the proto-vampire who resides in this book.

This isn't Twilight, nor is it Buffy the vampire Slayer, there aren't any friendly, helpful, romantic vampires here. None sparkle either There is quite probably a reason or maybe more than one why we wish so badly to laugh at this book. It does what it does very, very well This book is a classic that has been around for over a hundred years.. Come freely. Go safely. And leave something of the happiness you bring! Within a few days of his arrival, Harker will find himself talking of the Count' 'Welcome to my house. Within a few days of his arrival, Harker will find himself talking of the Count's 'wickedly blazing eyes' and 'new schemes of villainy' and have some hair-raising encounters with the man who is now the world's most famous vampire: 'The last I saw of Count Dracula was his kissing his hand to me, with a red light of triumph in his eyes, and with a smile that Judas in hell might be proud of.

The above quotations should make it abundantly clear what kind of book Dracula is. It's sensation fiction, written nearly half a century after the heyday of that genre. It's a cross between an epistolary novel, a detective novel and a save-my-wife story, and it's full of scares, horror and disgust, all described in a lurid tone that befits the subject: the living dead. Or the Un-Dead, as the book's other hero, my countryman Van Helsing, calls them. Sadly, Van Helsing is one of my main problems with the book. While I love his heroism, his 'Let's-do-it' attitude and his unceasing struggle for Mina's soul, I find him entirely unconvincing as a Dutchman. I wish to God with a crucifix and everything! I'm aware this is not a problem that will bother many readers, but I for one dearly wish Stoker had listened to some actual Dutchmen before making the hero of his story one.

Then perhaps he also would have refrained from making the poor man mutter German whenever he is supposed to speak his mother tongue. I mean, really. Linguistic inaccuracies aside there are many in the book , Dracula has a few more problems. For one thing, the bad guy doesn't make enough appearances. Whenever Stoker focuses on Dracula, the story comes alive -- menace drips off the pages, and the reader finds himself alternately shivering with excitement and recoiling in horror. However, when Dracula is not around which is most of the second half of the book , the story loses power, to the point where the second half of the book is actually quite dull.

In addition, the story seems a little random and unfocused. Remember the film, in which Dracula obsesses about Mina Harker Jonathan's wife because she is his long-lost wife reincarnated? That conceit had grandeur, romance, passion, tragedy. And what was more, it made sense. It explained why Dracula comes all the way from Transylvania to England to find Mina, and why he wants to make her his bride despite the fact that she is being protected by people who clearly want him dead. In the book, however, Mina is merely Jonathan's wife no reincarnation involved , a random lady Dracula has sunk his teeth into, and while this entitles her to some sympathy, it lacks the grand romantic quality the film had.

I guess it's unfair to blame an author for not thinking of an improvement film-makers later made to his story, but I think Stoker rather missed an opportunity there. And then there's the fact that Stoker seems to be an early proponent of the Robert Jordan School of Writing, meaning he takes an awful lot of time setting the scene, only to end the book on a whimper. The ending to Dracula is so anticlimactic it's rather baffling. Did Stoker run out of paper and ink? Did he want to finish the story before Dracula's brides came and got him?

I guess we'll never know. Still, despite its many flaws Dracula is an exciting read well, the first half is, anyway , and Stoker undeniably left a legacy that will last for centuries to come. In that respect, Dracula deserves all the praise that has been heaped on it. I still think it could have been better, though. Much better. View all 25 comments. Oct 25, Matt rated it it was amazing Shelves: audiobook. This is a classic monster tale I have enjoyed before, but could not wait to revisit as the season is rife with haunted ghouls and bloodthirsty readers! Young solicitor Johnathan Harker finds himself travelling through the Hungarian countryside and into Romania, on his way to a castle in the heart of Transylvania.

There, one Count Dracula awaits Harker and proves to be an odd, yet amenable, host. Seeking to finalise a land deal in England, Harker and Dracula talk long into the night, though the fo This is a classic monster tale I have enjoyed before, but could not wait to revisit as the season is rife with haunted ghouls and bloodthirsty readers! Seeking to finalise a land deal in England, Harker and Dracula talk long into the night, though the former feels that there is something odd about his host.

It is only when numerous unsettling things occur that Harker realises that Count Dracula is nothing like any man he has met before and eventually escapes the confines of the castle. Lucy Westenra suffers through significant bouts of sleepwalking. The two women travel to the seaside to clear their heads, but Lucy encounters someone the reader knows to be Dracula during one of her nocturnal jaunts and is eventually discovered with two minuscule puncture holes on her neck. Unsure of what to do, Westenra is sent to see Dr. Johnathan Seward, one of her suitors and director of the local mental hospital. When Dr. Seward cannot deduce all of these symptoms, he calls upon the renowned Dr.

Abraham Van Helsing in Amsterdam to consult. The Dutchman arrives and begins some of his early queries. He is highly interested, though cannot be completely sure that he has a diagnosis of yet. Slowly, Lucy begins to fade from this mysterious neck injury and eventually died of her injuries, though her body transforms into a vampire of sorts, paralleling some of the actions Count Dracula is known to have been committing.

Van Helsing works with Seward to locate the body and it is at this time that the Dutch doctor deduces that there is something eerie at work. Done with that issue, but still needing to resolve the larger concern at hand, Van Helsing gathers a group to hunt down the Count, who seems to have taken up residence in England, and drive him back to Transylvania. Lurking in the dark and gloomy areas of Eastern Europe, Van Helsing prepares for the fight of his life, armed with only the most basic medicaments, in hopes of slaying this monster once and for all.

Stoker lays the groundwork for a truly bone-chilling tale that has stood the test of time. I would highly recommend this to anyone who has the wherewithal to delve deep into the heart of a sensational 19th century story of horror and mayhem. I am still kicking myself that I waited so long to read this sensational piece of fiction. With a cast of powerful characters, Stoker weaves his tale in such a way that the story never loses its momentum. Harker, Seward, and Van Helsing are all well-crafted and provides powerful contrasts throughout the narrative, while Count Dracula is not only eerie in his presentation, but also one of the scariest villains in 19th century literature. There need not be outward descriptions of gore and slaying to get to the root of the suspense in this novel, which seems to differ from much of the writing in the genre today, where gushing blood and guts pepper the pages of every book imaginable.

The narrative is also ever-evolving, helped significantly by the journal-based writing that Stoker has undertaken. The reader is transported through the story using these varied perspectives and some press clippings , rather than a straight delivery of the story from a single point of view. This surely enhances the larger package and does much to provide the reader with even more fright, at certain times. There are surely many stories taking place here, some of which deal directly with the issue at hand read: Dracula , while others seem to solve themselves throughout the numerous journal entries. I wish to add for those who wish to take the audiobook approach, as I have done, the Audible version, with a full cast including Alan Cumming, Tim Curry, and John Lee , adds yet another dimension to this story and should not be discounted.

Kudos, Mr. Stoker, for such a riveting piece. I can only hope to find the time to read some of your other work, as well as that of your descendants, who seem to want to carry the torch and provide more Dracula for the modern reader. View all 50 comments. Sep 02, Luffy rated it it was amazing Shelves: 5-star. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Dracula, the book, struck a chord with me. In it was a fight between good and evil. Modern vampires have great seduction powers. I never liked that.

I also didn't like vampires in many Urban Fantasy books. The Hollows series spring to mind. The greatest change in the villainous vampires arises in Anne Rice's books. It was a perfect case study of an idea done to the death. In Dracula, several people record their impressions. I 'pretend' to know that the women in the books, Lucy and Mina, have the Dracula, the book, struck a chord with me. I 'pretend' to know that the women in the books, Lucy and Mina, have the same voice. Maybe the men are slightly different. They possess greater vocabulary, such as Lord Godalming's, and Jonathan Harker's recollections. Van Helsing, being a foreigner has his mistakes in grammar, and therefore has the most unique voice. Throughout the book, we don't see the vampire Dracula triumph much.

Except maybe when he turns Lucy into an undead. But even then, through the guiding hands and the knowledge of van Helsing, she is freed from her shackles. But Jonathan escapes from his imprisonment. And the vampire cannot settle in London. He was found out by our 'A-team' and had to flee for his life. He expresses baffled malignity. It is the testament to Bram Stoker's neatness that I could follow most of the story. And I'm in awe of his mind, which chronicles the entire story via journal entries or phonograph recordings in the case of John Steward , all of which are dated. I don't mean outdated, but dated, day after day. And I mourned the death of Quincy Morris, gallant to the end, dying with a smile on his lips. The entire book defies what happens in movies and series of which latter I've watched only True Blood.

Most people don't read books regularly. So their idea of the vampire comes from horror movies. And Boris Karloff and especially Bela Lugosi as vampires are etched in the minds of most people. I don't think cinephiles will get any influence from the movie directed by Francis Ford Coppola. That was a mess. The book still stands proud. As it should. Thus ends my review on 02 Sep View all 27 comments. Or so they say Isn't it a wonder that, once, there "There is reason that all things are as they are, and did you see with my eyes and know with my knowledge, you would perhaps better understand.

Isn't it a wonder that, once, there was this great and noble race, full of humanity and yet they become a blight upon the land, transforming into the deadly scourge that blots out all hope and becoming the very figure that we dread and detest? Is it enough that we create our own monsters or that we are monsters ourselves? For if humans were to be given these: immortality, power, youth, and ever-lasting beauty, the world would eventually plunge into never-ending darkness. Acquire the lot of them and what you will find is a soul devoid of humanity, only to be filled eventually with malice and greed. Stare at the mirror and one would hardly see any reflection at all.

Stoker was an invalid Heroism In Bram Stokers Dracula he started school at the age Heroism In Bram Stokers Dracula seven — when he made a complete Heroism In Bram Stokers Dracula astounding recovery. Stoker, Heroism In Bram Stokers Dracula such a riveting piece. Heroism In Bram Stokers Dracula is a National Geographic feature on a Romanian people living in the Carpathians and in the Transylvanian Alps etc.

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